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thoughts on the use of them domestically here in the united states. if you support their use for a wide variety of purposes, here is how you can give your support -- oppose their use 00 -- you can tweet us -- we had about 30 people chiming in before the start of the program. you could also send us an e- mail. it is the association of unmanned vehicle systems international. this story and convention is the featured story here on the front page of the wall"options and times" --ngton news" talks about their use in the united states and reaction to them -- that is the opinion on the use of drones in the united states. the topic for first half hour. we want to get your thoughts on their use. call on the line that best represents you and be prepared to tell us why. use, 202-t thethe us 585-381. out to how you can reach us. facebook.com available too. i see novans saying problems using them for military operations but do not think they should be used again surveillance -- civilians under any circumstances and they should not be allowed to be used for any individual to target another individual
of us know this is the true place, the mother ship. [applause] so i wanted to start this morning by paying tribute. the reality tv rush hour-free zone, which is one of its appeals. now, i can't claim and i am not a true native chataquan like many of you, that go back four, five, seeven six generations. in fact, i grew up outside of boston, massachusetts. i am a patriots fan. admittedly behind enemy lines here in buffalo bills territory. but i was born in buffalo general hospital. so, mr. president, i'd like to apply again for citizenship in chaw tack qua nation. -- chautauqua nation. i'm pleased to be discussing diplomacy. i'm glad that chautauqua has decided to spend some time talking about this venerable art, sometimesis understood, stiemsma lined, but always important as diplomacy. i'm a former career american diplomat. i served five presidents between my first job. i was the lowest ranking person in the u.s. government. i was an intern at our ambassador in mauritania in west africa in 1980. until my last job as undersecretary of state in 2008. and you now have the privilege o
mason university in virginia. you can reach him on twitter. thanks for being with us this morning and talking about eminent domain. that will do it for this "orning's washington journal next, we will take you live to the national press club where they will be recognizing out going homeland security secretary jenna not a ton of who is stepping down from her position, taking the chair as president of the university of california. live coverage is next on c-span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] the shift to [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> we are live at the national press club in washington, dc awaiting remarks from out going homeland security department secretary janet napolitano. earlier this summer, she announced she would be stepping down from her cap in a position to become president of the university of california system which includes ucla and the university of california berkeley among other campuses this is. we are expecting her in a moment. >> ladies and gentlemen, we will start into moments of silence all cell phones
security forces out front. we are also seeing, for >> they have accepted training and continue to allow us to conduct drone operations. all of those are signs that things are improving. the recent visit by the u.s. in part was to deliver the message that we need to see stepped-up operations in light of the intelligence we're receiving. host: the "washington post" reporting there have been four drone attacks over the last 10 days. and in comparison, seven months have passed with no drone attacks. guest: right, that shows you right there that, two things, they're trying to show seriousness. two, the drones also have been reported as flying at low levels around the urban areas to demonstrate a show of force. that's politically difficult for the host government because, as you know, the drone strikes have created some domestic tension. so in terms of being able to demonstrate to the u.s. that they are serious, those are steps that are confidence building measures. -- ted jada cople has coppel has written, america's chronic overreaction to terrorism, we had excerpts. but the country's capacity
the way i think. host: john hickenlooper is joining us for mill walking, where the nga summer meeting is gathering -- from milwaukee, where the nga summer meeting is gathering. >> tomorrow, we will talk with michael harpster. he is with the fbi unit talking about child prostitution around the country. then tough insurance rates with kaiser health news and senior correspondent phil galloway -- galewitz. and we are heading now live to milwaukee for the final day of the national governors association meeting will be getting underway shortly. it is expected to start any moment now. the chair of this year's hearing l. governor markel the next session that they will be dealing with is the closing session, the state and cybersecurity. "the washington post" talks about why waiting for promised to fix cybersecurity is a waste of time by brian fung. it says that the commerce committee approved a version of the cybersecurity bill that now heads to the senate floor. but the bill is a sign of how timid lawmakers have become on the issue compared to previous attempts. as the just watch governors ga
of justice, men and women without rank or wealth or title or fame would liberate us all in ways that our children now take for granted. people of all colors and creeds live and learn and walk together, and fight alongside one another and love one another. and judge one another by the content of our character in this greatest nation on earth. to dismiss the magnitude of this progress, to suggest as some sometimes do the little has changed -- that little has changed, that dishonors the courage and sacrifice sacrifice of those who paid the price to march. [cheers and applause] james chaney, andrew goodman, martin luther king, jr. -- they did not die in vain. their victory was great. but we would dishonor those heroes as well to suggest that the work of this nation is somehow complete. the ark of the moral universe may bend towards justice, but it does not bend on its own. to secure the gains this country has made requires constant vigilance, not complacency. whether it is by challenging those who erect new barriers to the vote, or ensure that the scales of justice work equally for all in th
later, the president of doctors of the world u.s. a talks about recent humanitarian efforts in turkey, jordan, and lebanon in response to the health impact of the syrian civil war. >> we are going to keep on voting, keep our job building, keep on educating, keep on mentoring, keep on community building, we are going to keep on ending violence. we are going to keep on creating peace. we are not going to let nobody turn us around. ♪ martin luther king the third, one of the featured speakers at yesterday's daylong march on washington, celebrating 19630th anniversary of the march on washington. welcome to "washington journal" on the sunday, august 25, 2013. we will play you a couple of more comments from yesterday's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send journal@c-span.org us an e-mail,
suit tomorrow after one more vote on health care. summer break is upon us here in washington, d.c. one headline says lawmakers are leaving capitol hill pretty empty-handed. both sides are pointing fingers at each other. want to get your thoughts this thursday morning on the congressional session thus far, what is being done and perhaps not being done. here are the numbers. if not by sound, you can send aus a tweet. you can post your comment on facebook and you can send us an e-mail. we look forward to hearing from you. here is one of the headlines this morning in "the huffington post" -- they're talking about congressman harold rogers, the republican of kentucky who chairs the appropriations committee. writes about this as well. russell permanent shares the byline and joins us by phone. burman shares the by line. guest: pretty interesting day in the house yesterday. they were considering a house appropriations bill to fund the department of transportation and housing and urban development. this has been a key bill implementing deep cuts offered by congressman paul ryan. they effectivel
-3880 for democrats, and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also contact us through social media, @cspanwj is our twitter and appeared you consider e-mail if you'd like to journal@c-span.org. "hill" newhe'll" -- savor this morning host: that is from the "hill" newspaper. and from "politico" this morning -- john boehner calls for a short-term continuing resolution. here's a little bit from the speaker from yesterday. [video clip] >> the appropriators have a tough job over the last couple of years. they have taken a lot of tough votes in their committee. so i understand the frustration that they are dealing with. but i just want to make clear -- the sequestration is going to remain in effect until the president agrees to cut some toorms that will allow us remove it. the president insisted on the sequester, and none of us wanted, none of us like it. there are smarter ways to cut spending. the house has moved twice over the last year and a half to replace the sequester. we saw no action in the united states senate. so if they want the sequester to go, we will have to get serious about our long
caps and makes it difficult for us to accomplish the goals we have for our country across a variety of fronts. i think there is a growing sense that there is a need to re-look at it. >> you do not have any idea of what the numbers are or some of the projects. i can live with it. >> with i am saying to you is that the situation is obviously very fluid. in our department, we happen to be ready for just about anything. >> thank you, mr. secretary. we are honored to have you with us. most governors recognize how important transportation is to their success in their states. as a former elected official, you understand that. it is economic development and the ability to expand economically. in the state of utah, we have stepped up our commitment to transportation in a significant way. we have put 500% more state money into state highways, roads, and into a augmenting the state system. we just completed 15 miles of interstate 15, expanding the lane capacity, hov lanes. we did it all without federal dollars. we are trying to put our resources where we think they need to be in the infrastruc
eastern. be sure to join us this evening for another of our town hall meetings. the focus today is unimplemented asian of the affordable care act. administration will delay implementation of the section of the law covering limits to out- of-pocket costs for consumers. we will check in on congressional town hall meetings around the nation and what questions members of congress are getting from their constituents. we'll get an update on court challenges to the law and check out the rollout of healthcare exchanges which is opposed to take effect by january 1 of next year. here is a brief art of tonight's program. i don't think you understand the law you are in charge of executing and enforcing. the clawback where you limit how much a person pays back, that is only a person who is eligible for a subsidy if their income changes in the year in which the subsidy takes place. person, -- if a person gets a subsidy they are not eligible for which will clearly be the case if your major enforcement tool, the employer mandate is not in place, the law requires you clawback 100 % of that subsi
-year-old turned to us and asked what that means. we discovered for to quickly that that is not an easy concept to explain to a five-year-old. we said, it is something that you believe in, that you spend time on. that and lookut at us and said, kind of like we stand for barack obama? we said, absolutely. [applause] of course, after my wife got done patting ourselves on the back for teaching our five-year- old who the right choice in the presidential race was, i thought about that. what i stand for, what our neighborhood stands for, our communities stand for, and what our state stands for. it is things like an economy built from the middle out. healthcare for everybody. the idea that our communities are stronger because of the bonds we share and the answers to the challenges we face lie in the future and not the past. a lot of times campaigns become about little things, doors to knock, phone calls to make, as on tv, twitter feeds, facebook posts, but everyone should allow campaigns to become about bigger questions. this is one of those campaigns. the question to me is, are we going to continue t
are on board with largelyl action there, countries that are siding with the u.s. are calling for more diplomacy. that reported in the papers as well. we want to ask about the role of the international community on potential actions in syria and what purpose they serve. if you want to give your thoughts on the international on onety's role in syria of our social media outlets, you can do so on twitter, @cspanwj. you can always send us an e-mail -- journal@cspan.org. guardian" from "the newspaper this morning from the united kingdom. "threat of commons revolt forces allies to delay syria missile strike" is the headline. "whitehall sources indicate that the u.s., which had planned to launch the strikes by the weekend, may be prepared to revive a backup plan to delay strikes until tuesday when the president is due to set out for the g 20 summit in russia. in an effort to build support for punitive strikes, the u.s. and u.k. will publish a joint summary of the intelligence which they say points toward the assad regime's response ability for the poison gas attack of august 21 in eastern damascus that
earlier today. inin june, the supreme court their calculated decision to keep us from voting, to keep ups from the voting booth, was determined, as determined by the highest court of our land. the supreme court we have come to understand that we cannot count on to protect our rights or to respect the constitution that guarantees all our rights. constitution the that is supposed to be for not some people, but for all of the people. now we have right-wing pushingans who are restrictive voter id legislation in states around the country that will make it more difficult for us to make our voices heard. 6, 80 twost restricted voting bills have been introduced in 31 states. north carolina has just gone crazy. it has passed legislation to require certain kinds of i the -- i.d. the latest bill was signed into law earlier this month by the north carolina governor. this law attempts to prohibit terrence of college students and claiming them as dependents when they file their taxes if the student registrants to vote anywhere other than the parent'' home. under the new law, the same students are requi
of whether you do for our state. how you represent us. there were 100 like you. i'm reminded, because i have few years, when strom thurmond said a million ere, a million there, pretty soon we are talking about some real money. talking were still about a million here and there. now we are talking about illions and getting desensitized about money, where whatnot.nd e have a debt limit coming up next month, actually in october. we pay ourinded that bills and that this is not to spend, it is to pay what we have already spent. point.the whole when are you going to curb spending so we don't have to raising the didn't limit to pay our bills? that is the problem as i see it. that is just a basic -- >> so your question is? why do we keep letting them spend our money? from?does this come t -- was congress feels the one that allocated money. we have serious problems that that money could go for. the federal ll, budget under the johnson fee was unified. so you con tuesday social money which ss as started running a deficit five or six years ago with everything else. is mandatory spending which congress
that are affordable and accessible. these men and women are outstanding. they have helped us in our exercises and drills and our training. i know that the council of governors is anxious to explore a better defined role for our national guard in this new domain. we also signed a $3 million cybersecurity tax credit into law to accelerate job growth in this field. for all of the focus that we have seen on the national level, we still have a lot of work to do in order to elevate the collaboration between a federal government and states in this realm. that is where the nga resource center on's eight cybersecurity's is working. we are working to fill the void. one of these tools is the governor's call to action for cybersecurity that will lay out a framework that all of us can pursue. governance authority, risk assessment, continuous vulnerability and threat assessments and the like. we also introduced an electronic dashboard that governors can use to understand their states level of readiness at a glance. moving forward, we are exploring for areas. we are looking for stronger collaboration betwee
, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt that the syrian regime used chemical weapons against its own people. military officials discussed yesterday about coordinating response in attacks against the syrian targets. and the headlines from the washington post is this, proof against bashar assad is at hand. the obama administration believe that u.s. intelligence has established how syrian government forces stored, assembled and launched chemical weapons outside of damascus that killed hundreds of people. the administration is planning to release evidence possibly tomorrow. it will prove that president bashar assad -- from the hill newspaper reaction from members of congress the headline is nearly two dozen members of congress signing on to a letter demanding that the president first consult congress. the letter was led by a republican from virginia beach. quote, engaging our milit
: you can reach out to us on social media this morning. "the walle take from street journal." others have insight and background and this is from "the washington post." the larger context this morning is about the cancellation of meetings between president obama and president clinton and russia over issues. we want to -- and president vladimir putin. you can alsol -- use social media. maryland is up first on our democrat line. caller: good morning. host: what do you think about the cancellation of this meeting? caller: i think it is kind of silly because when you have problems with somebody, shouldn't you talk to them? why you cancel a meeting if you've got problems with their neighbor, you go talk to your neighbor. that the white house says because progress was made, a summit was not good at this time. that is their argument. caller: i still think you have to talk to people. host: if that's the case, talk pointwhat the discussion be and how does edward snowden complicate this? caller: that really complicate everything. host: there he is on the screen, edward it snowed in. --ginia, c
in the room. complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house as a public house of -- as a public service of private industry. we are c-span. now, you can watch us in hd. of first ladies begins. tonight, we have an encore of the final program about ida mckinley. william mckinley. >> the story of ida mckinley can be told through an exploration between her husband william mckinley. they spent 30 years together which brought them happiness early on. it changed their life into illness and devotion to shape the presidency at the turn of the new century. joining us tonight to tell the story of ida mckinley are two guests returning to the table, richard norton smith and carl anthony. we are going to start our program with film. this is the first time that a president and first lady have been captured on film in the the united states. this rare footage is mr. and mrs. mckinley coming on stage in 1901. that date is significant because the next day the president would be shot by an assassin's bullets. what was it about this exhibition that attracted the president to want to go? >> it was a world th
thoughts on this. republicans -- send us a tweet @cspanwj. you can also e-mail us, journal@c-span.org. we will begin with josh rogan who broke the story. he is our senior correspondent on the phone. is headline in your piece the obama administration secretly suspended military aid to egypt. how did you find this out? the primary source was senator patrick leahy, he is the chairman of the state and foreign appropriations subcommittee. i asked a lot of people what was going on with this $1.3 billion of u.s. military aid to egypt. their understanding was that it had been halted. i investigated a little bit further and what i found was that the administration's review of military aid is ongoing. they are going through a broad review of the entire u.s. egypt relationship. they decided not to disburse most forms of the military aid, with some exceptions this was a -- with some to exceptions. despite the fact that the administration is determined that -- if that sounds at the mouthful, it is because it is. where's the money in the process? and what impact will it have? administration public line
the navy, air force, army, marines than american diplomats. >> this weekend, the history of u.s. diplomatic efforts in the middle east and his call for a return to diplomacy. saturday morning at 10:00 eastern. ld you define the american dream? he traces the american dream. the great depression through the 21st century. change the story when the truth is more exciting? foundings of the fathers at noon eastern. >> a round table discussion from the representative for center for american progress and cato institute on a number of issues, including immigration, efforts to repeal the nation's health care law, and gun control. from today's "washington journal." host: we are going to talk now about an interesting issue thanksgiving developing around the country as it relates to state's sovereignty. these are the reactions by states to federal law and what the states are trying to do about it in some cases. our guests this morning at the table are ilya shapiro of the cato institute. he's a senior fellow for constitutional studies, good morning. >> good morning. >> we are also joined by i
find most incredible about his story? how commonplace it is. everyone of us here has a story just like that, whether it is us or our parents or great grandparents. we are all the children of those who risked everything. for freedom. us could walk up here one at a time and tell those stories. i am going to suggest that is the most fundamental dna of what it means to be an american, to value freedom and opportunity above all else. that is why we are going to succeed in turning this around. say,inal thing i want to if you remember nothing that i said tonight, then you probably had too much to drink. [laughter] if you remember one thing that i said tonight, let it be this. as dire as things look right now, i am profoundly optimistic. we have seen things look dire before. i am optimistic for three simple reasons. number one, we are right. freedom works. [applause] there is a very simple dynamic, conservatives win when we effectively articulate what it is we believe. this is fundamentally a center- right nation. liberals win when they effectively off the skate -- obduscate what they believe.
will be saving, each of us. in addition to that, my husband was seeing his doctor at a medical building and he was complaining about his hands hurting. they sent him for x-rays at a place affiliated with the hospital and for taking a couple x-rays of his hands, we got a bill for $750, which flabbergasted us. i was so upset. but once it was submitted to our insurance plan the bill came back to $450, which is an example of how outrageous our islthcare system is in the-- and the expense that it is involved with it. we are currently paying, we have a family of three, about $900 a month. i am self-employed, making not much -- maybe $500 a month. my husband's income is close to $80,000 a year. two years ago, in order to save money, i went on a catastrophic plan, but it ended up not saving us money because we saved $100 a month previous to what we were paying on his family plan. but my deductibles were so high that all of a sudden it was really a bad decision to go that route. my real question for you is, will the family of three be allowed to -- if my husband can get discounted insurance rates, hims
lot of things bush did, it is reflecting the political reality. the question for us in this us as americans, is to say, it is kind of bleak to think the united states will have to operate drones and have shady partnerships in places like yemen. it is hard work. it does not necessarily would we be willing to accept a certain inevitability as i think europeans in the 1970's accepted that there will be terrorist attacks from time to time and it's not the end of the world. this is what i think janet knap when she was department of homeland security, when she was in charge of the department of homeland security, talked about he idea of resilience. we're beginning to see some people sighing that they don't like drones either. and so we haven't really been able -- i think that the side that wants to talk about scaling back the war on terrorism at this point should also talk about the idea that it's not a false choice to quote obama from the national archives speech between liberty and security. it's a very real choice. and we should be coming to terms with that. >> i think liberty vs.
and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail journal@c-span.org. is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short money. it's a nightmare. mark writes, college education has the highest correlation with future earning potential. little bit from the write ups from the paper today. the president is on a two-day four stop tour of upstate new york and northeast pennsylvania. we'll have more coverage today. the washington post writes obama proposes a college rating system. for decades magazines have rated colleges to help families navigate the higher education market. on thursday president obama proposed that the federal government rate the nation's schools to hold them accountable for performance and help bring soaring tuition under control. by the 2015 school year, obama says his administration will begin evaluating colleges own measu
system that might align it with what is good host: our guest is then castleman. he is joining us from a new york city. inc. you for your time. -- thank you for your time. guest: thank you for having me on. washington journal starts at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. enjoy your friday. we will see you back here tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. ♪ >> president obama continues his two bus tour focusing on education issues. yesterday he spoke in syracuse. town hall holding a meeting. live coverage at 12:45. most of the presidents tour -- vice president biden is expected to join president obama at lackawanna college. yesterday's first stop, hisident obama revealed plan to control college costs. >> let me talk about these briefing. our first priority. providing better value for students. making sure parents and taxpayers are getting what we -- what they paid for. there going to lead development to trade a better system for the college year. a lot of colleges are encouraged andnc. -- gaining numbers it is rewarding them on raising cost. i think we should reward colleges based on opportunity. are they helping
, give us a call a 202-585-3881. our line for republicans. 202-585-3808 for democrats. and a line for independents, end us an email at journal @c-span.org or send us a tweet at c-span wj. caller: thank you very much for taking my call. i wanted to make a comment on secretary of state's press conference yesterday and the press briefing that followed. the entire tone and tenor was that somehow this was our fault. i don't understand why it is we own this problem. they have been fighting each other over there for centuries. why is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no busines
. we have a serious problem. it requires us to have a national discussion because the problem, mainly, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally
. we're hoping she may tip the cards for what the future might hold. [laughter] please help us give a warm welcome to senator wendy davis. [applause] >> thank you. thank you all for having me here today, and thank you, angela, for inviting me to be here. it is a pleasure to be with such an esteemed group of people. i have to tell you people get a little bit nervous when i approach a podium these days. you obviously know what happened on june 25 in the texas legislature, but in case you were one of the few people not live streaming it, i thought i would repeat the entire thing for you today. [laughter] let's get comfortable. in all seriousness, i am very honored and so grateful you are interested in hearing more from me. i am constantly reminded what a privilege it is to have of voice. though i mean the voice figuratively, my initial understanding of the power of voice was quite literal. when i was a young girl my family tried to spend as much time as we could with my grandparents. they lived in the panhandle of texas. my grandfather made his living his entire life as a tenant farmer
crime of human trafficking. in so many ways, today's a.b.a. is reminding us that although our laws must be continually updated, our shared dedication to the cause of justice and the ideals set forth by our constitution must remain constant. it is this sense of dedication that brings me to san francisco today, to enlist your partnership in forging a more just society. to ask for your leadership in reclaiming once more the values we haled hold dear. and to draw upon the a.b.a.'s legacy of achievement in calling on every member of our profession to question that which is accepted truth, to challenge that which is unjust, to break free of a tired status quo, and to take bold steps to reform and strengthen america's criminal justice system in concrete and fundamental ways. it is time to address persistent needs and unwarranted disparities by considering a fundamentally new approach. as a prosecutor, judge, and attorney in private practice, i have seen the criminal justice system firsthand in nearly every angle. while i have the jut most faith and dedication to america's legal system, we must
program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total population are using the while we haveram. an ag program, the program is not functioning right now and we do not have one to address these other low- skilled categories, so there is no way for them to come legally under the current system. host: gramm, michigan, mary, go ahead. caller: good morning, i just wanted to say several things. one, people do not understand that the obama care is directly related to what is going to happen if immigration passes. what is going to happen is americans are going to be forced to be covered by obama care, whereas the bill as it stands now, illegals will not be covered by this, so therefore, who do you think the employer is going to employ? not the american citizen. it will be the person they do not have to give health care to. host: rebecca? guest: i am not a health-care expert, there are interesting conceits to the health care bill that i will fully admit i do not understand. the c
of reasons. the vast majority of americans do want surveillance to take place to prevent us against terrorists. they do want this balance. also, it is hard to see even if i know intellectually that the nsa might be knowing what phone calls or numbers go in and out of my phone and intercepting some of my e-mails and that sort of thing, it is hard for us to see how it impacts our lives. it is different from the economy and jobs and obamacare. it may be more of an intellectual exercise that does not really rise to the top of the political debates. >> we will watch to see how all of the issues unfold. charles babington, karen tumulty, thank you. i appreciate it. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] on monday1, a conversation with former vice president dick cheney and his daughter, who announced her run as republican senate. 7:30 p.m. eastern. , tuesday morning, outgoing homeland security secretary janet napolitano will get remarks at the national press club. shecertain -- cease -- served since 2009. >> republica
for using the only legislative vehicle we is towhat we really need have a serious hearing investigation where you actually hold people accountable and you look at the law and you change it. you do not have the same director or deputy -- there have multiple people. people under investigation right now. there will be laws. if you look at the financial services bill that has gone through appropriations. not only is the irs defunded for but they have cut the budget. i think the same thing needs to happen with the possible examination of the nsa. but i do not think we ought to immediately toss out a program until we think about it and look at it, you know, and the homeland security people on both sides of the aisle tell us it has done the job. >> ok. one thing i would like to point out though -- if the program were abused, we would not know. let me rephrase that. we would not know it until it was too late. know or have i read that the way this deal was supposed to work was when the controversy first kind of started, they were going to monitor these phone calls to find terrorists outside the
, again we probably would find common ground. i would also like to see us get rid of sequestration, but do it by recontributing the cuts to the nondiscretionary side of the budget where i think they belong. we need to keep the savings, that's why the deficit is coming down, but there's certainly smarter and better ways to do that. if the president is willing to do that, i suspect he would find a willing negotiating partner on our side of the aisle. in fact, though, many of my friends advocate what is effectively a third tax increase this year. we had a tax increase with the so-called fiscal cliff when all the bush tax cuts ended. the president used that to raise taxes. we have a tax increase this year associated with his health care plan kicking in that's major. now my friends on the other side of the aisle want a third tax increase, and to keep the government open and operating. we think we can spend money better and smarter, and that we ought to continue to reduce spending not increase the burdens on the american people. finally, i want to talk to my friend who discussed obamacare. she's
at 9:00 15 a.m., the u.s. census bureau discuss state and local government finances and the health of ♪ host: what do my angelou, sandra day o'connor, jesse jackson and betty ford all have in common? they have all been awarded the presidential honor of freedom. and president obama is named the newest recipient. clinton, loretta lynn, oprah winfrey, and sally ride are among them. who would you nominate for a presidential medal of freedom? share with us this morning on "washington journal to go (202) 585-3880 four republican, (202) 585-3881 for democrats and (202) 585-3882 for independents. you can also e-mail us or send it via twitter, @cspanwj facebook.com/c-span, or journal@c-span.org is our e-mail address. here is an article from the "hill" newspaper. host: andy 16 recipients for the newest batch of presidential medal of freedom honorees, president oakland the, opera daniel, sally ride, bayard loretta lynn, kahneman,niel patricia ward, arturo sandoval, gloria steinem, ernie banks. post"rmer "washington editor receiving the medal of freedom. it says here 91 years old, who remain
outreach efforts to women and minority communities. the us is 40 minutes. >> first, to my left she was elected to the house of representatives at age 23 and is in her fourth term and is on the finance committee and has a record on leading on women's health and job growth and is a leader in the latino community. she is in her fourth term, on the finance committee and as a record of leading and women's health and job growth. she is also a leader in the latino community and has been featured on fox news latino. she has received the innovative health care pioneer award and was recognized as one of the 45 most influential women under 45 by the republican security council. i want to thank her. we also saw each other as well in new york. thank you for coming. for coming. karin agness, to my right, was the founder and president of the network of the enlightened women, the nation's premier organization for conservative university women. she is a graduate of the university of virginia for her undergrad and a law degree. not an easy law school to get into. she practices law in d.c. and is a s
america's gilded capital." thanks for joining us. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] for free transcripts or two give us comments about this program, and-a-.org. q- " programs are also available as a podcast. next, a discussion of republican outreach efforts with rnc chairman reince priebus . then minnesota center mf global -- amy klobuchar giving of fundraiser in iowa. after that, another chance to see "q&a" with author mark cleavage. vitch.bo quick there are two ways that you pay for localism, local content. you pay through an advertising model, the historic model, or now a growing stream, retransmission consent. it will find its level like any market. right now it sees itself far more for it content than it pays to broadcasters, and the truth of the matter is our content is the one the people watched the most. you look at 100 talkshows any of them are94 broadcast content. so, it is worth something. and it is important that we fight and win this battle on transmission consent because candidly it is
in the community. you can tell us what you think will work. the other thing is i was hoping people who are involve in good things have shared those because i don't think we need to keep inventing the wheel. we need to support what's going on in chicago now. there are a lot of good thingings. we're not connecting with each other. so sometimes we don't nope the good things going on. and i i think we need to give resources, people, money, i'm not sure what everybody needs to further those programs, expand the programs, duplicate those programs in what's been mention md. we want to take the show on the road. we want to go to new orleans, baltimore, other places. it's not just in chicago that these things are occurring. the plan when we leave here is going back to the rest of the caucus to let them know what went on here. you will hear from us. we are committed to you hearing from us. we need to hear from you. we can't do it alone. we want to help you. >> i want to thank you for that. it's also an established group, it's the 1570 club. 1570 a.m. by harold davis. we're working with those two. those are
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